Blog

Interning at Ashoka by Grishma Rimal

by tuftsigl
Interning at Ashoka by Grishma Rimal Jun 22

It takes approximately 140 seconds to get from the bottom to the top of the escalators at the Rosslyn Metro Station. Every morning, I take those escalators on my way to work. On days when I'm not too eager to meet the 10,000-steps goal on my Fitbit, I take the two-plus-minute ride, listening to an NPR podcast, and marvel at everything I see around me. The colossal size of the station, the morning rush to work, tourists from across the world, bored middle schoolers on their field trips, and musicians playing captivating melodies —it all puts a smile on my face.

Jun 21

Interning at the Office for Refugees and Immigrants in Boston by Brianna Gates

by tuftsigl

Last semester, I attended the IGL Migration Series where I was introduced to Mary Troung, the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Office for Refugees and Immigrants (ORI). The mission of ORI is to integrate refugees and immigrants into the fabric of the Commonwealth.

Jun 21

The Finnish Model for National Defense Blog Post #2 by Lionel Oh

by tuftsigl

On the side trip to Helsinki as part of this year’s ALLIES Joint Research Project in Estonia, some of us visited the National Museum of Finland.

Jun 21

PNDP: Energy Resilience in Puerto Rico By Cody Eaton

by tuftsigl

As a participant in the Program for Narrative and Documentary Practice (PNDP) this past spring, I’ve come to learn that headlines only capture a fraction of reality, and thus it is important to amplify what plays out in their shadows.

Jun 18

Joint Research Project in Estonia, Blog post #1by Benjamin Cooper

by tuftsigl

After arriving in Tallinn to warm weather and sunlight, the Tufts, West Point, and Naval Academy contingents began the Joint Research Project at US Embassy Tallinn.

Jun 15

Cyber-attacks in Estonia Blog Post #1 Lionel Oh

by tuftsigl

It has been six days since we arrived in Estonia, and this small Baltic state and its plethora of unique problems and circumstances has really piqued my curiosity. When you have 45,000 square kilometers to share among a population of 1.3 million, there is a lot of land to go around.